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Understanding and Teaching Evolution

University of Bath via FutureLearn

1 Review 72 students interested
Found in K12, Biology

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Overview

Find out how to teach evolution to 7–16 year olds

How does evolution happen? Can we observe it in real time? How do new species come about and how long does this take?

When you think about evolution, you may think of Darwin, but modern genetics has transformed our understanding of how evolution happens. This course uses this new genetics-centred approach to explain key concepts in our scientific understanding of evolution.

The course starts with the genetics of inheritance and variation, how natural selection and adaptation leads to speciation, followed by macroevolution and geological time, ending with human evolution.

The course is aimed at primary and secondary school teachers, students, parents, and anyone interested in understanding evolution.

Taught by

Laurence Hurst (Educator)

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Review for FutureLearn's Understanding and Teaching Evolution
5.0 Based on 1 reviews

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Anonymous
5.0 2 months ago
Anonymous is taking this course right now.
Thank Heaven for this course, just by its existence it deserves 5 stars -- when I was young in Texas... well, even into early 21st century teaching evolution is tricky, with some people associated with a certain GW Bush messing around in Texas & elsewhere. Do see Wikipedia

Just the intro below:

Christina Castillo Comer (born 1950) is the former Director of Science in the curriculum division of the Texas Education Agency (TEA). Comer spent nine years as the Director of Science until she resigned on November 7, 2007.[1][2] Comer's resignation has sparked controversy about agency politics and the debate to teach evolution in public schools versus creationism or intelligent design. Prior to her position at the TEA, Comer was a middle school science teacher with San Antonio Independent School District.[3]
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