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The Open University

Language and thought: introducing representation

The Open University via OpenLearn

Overview

How does what you say come to mean something? Does what you say inherently represent what you, the speaker, think it means, whatever that might be, or does what you say carry its own meaning, ...

Syllabus

  • Introduction
  • Learning outcomes
  • 1 Introducing representation
  • 1 Introducing representation
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Representation and language
  • 1.3 Representation and thought
  • 1.4 Three characteristic difficulties in discussions of representation
  • 1.5 Some useful terminology and a convention
  • 1.6 Further reading
  • 2 Is the speaker's mind the source of an utterance's meaning?
  • 2 Is the speaker's mind the source of an utterance's meaning?
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 The source of an utterance's meaning: the words used or the speaker's mind?
  • 2.3 Grice on natural and non-natural meaning
  • 2.4 The meaning of expressions versus the meaning of individual utterances
  • 2.5 Why intentions?
  • 2.6 Which intentions?
  • 2.7 Expression meaning as defined by Grice
  • 2.8 The Gricean Programme
  • 2.9 How successful is Grice's theory of the meaning of utterances?
  • 2.9.1 The Humpty objection
  • 2.9.2 Searle's objection
  • 2.10 Section summary
  • 2.11 Further reading
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Acknowledgements

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