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University of Colorado Boulder

Semiconductor Photonics Graduate Certificate

University of Colorado Boulder via Coursera MasterTrack

Overview

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While 20th-century technology was defined by the growth of electronics, the 21st century belongs to photonics which encompasses technologies for lighting, energy conversion, displays, imaging, communications, manufacturing, and medicine.

Graduates of the Semiconductor Photonics Graduate Certificate will command skills in design, fabrication, and laboratory practice to place them at the forefront of these industries and many more not yet invented. This certificate imparts rigorous knowledge of fundamental building blocks for solid-state photonic devices. It starts from the quantum theory of solids and fundamentals of semiconductor devices and on to cover advanced photonic devices such as solid-state lighting, semiconductor lasers, photodetectors, and energy conversion devices.

__In this program, you will:__

- __Learn how different wavelengths propagate through systems__, then move on to aberrations that appear with high angle, non-paraxial systems and how to correct those problems.
- __Use mathematical tools like Zemax and OpticStudio__ to analyze high-performance systems.
- __Understand the energy band structures__ and their significance in the electric properties of solids.
- __Design a semiconductor light-emitting diode__ and analyze its efficiency and semiconductor laser.
- __Understand and analyze the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device__, MOS field-effect transistors (MOSFET), and more.
- __Select a display technology__ for a given application (LIDAR, imaging, microscopy, etc.).
- __Choose suitable semiconductor materials__ for light-emitting devices
- __Design a system__ around the limitations of a given display technology (i.e. addressing).
- __Use nanophotonic effects__ (low dimensional structures) to engineer lasers.
- __Analyze the carrier statistics, carrier dynamics__, and the resulting conduction properties of semiconductors.

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Syllabus

Course 1: ECEA 5600: First Order Optical System Design (1 credit)
- Optical instruments are how we see the world, from corrective eyewear to medical endoscopes to cell phone cameras to orbiting telescopes. __Learner Outcomes:__ - Design to first order such optical systems with simple mathematical and graphical techniques. - Develop the foundation needed to begin all optical design as well as the intuition needed to quickly address the feasibility of complicated designs during brainstorming meetings. - Enter these designs into an industry-standard design tool, OpticStudio by Zemax, to analyze and improve performance with powerful automatic optimization methods. Prior knowledge needed: Undergraduate level physics, Undergraduate level calculus (e.g. manipulating integrals and derivatives, trigonometry and linear algebra, engineering problem-solving skills), Ability to run windows programs (Optics Studio), and Experience with Matlab or equivalent platform and Mathematica can be helpful.

Course 2: ECEA 5601: Optical Efficiency and Resolution (1 credit)
- Optical instruments are how we see the world, from corrective eyewear to medical endoscopes to cell phone cameras to orbiting telescopes. The first-order optical system design covered in the previous course is useful for the initial design of an optical imaging system but does not predict the energy and resolution of the system. This course discusses the propagation of intensity for Gaussian beams and incoherent sources. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Design optical systems with simple mathematical and graphical techniques. - Mathematical background required to design an optical system with the required field of view and resolution. - Analyze the characteristics of your optical system using an industry-standard design tool, OpticStudio by Zemax. Prior knowledge needed: Undergraduate level physics, Undergraduate level calculus (e.g. manipulating integrals and derivatives, trigonometry and linear algebra, engineering problem-solving skills), Ability to run windows programs (Optics Studio), and Experience with Matlab or equivalent platform and Mathematica can be helpful.

Course 3: ECEA 5602: Design of High-Performance Optical Systems (1 credit)
- Optical instruments are how we see the world, from corrective eyewear to medical endoscopes to cell phone cameras to orbiting telescopes. This course extends what you have learned about first-order, paraxial system design and optical resolution, and efficiency with the introduction to real lenses and their imperfections. __Learning Outcomes:__ - How different wavelengths propagate through systems, then move on to aberrations that appear with high angle, non-paraxial systems and how to correct those problems. - Optical components beyond lenses and an excellent example of a high-performance optical system – the human eye. - The mathematical tools required for the analysis of high-performance systems are complicated enough that this course will rely more heavily on OpticStudio by Zemax. - Analyze systems that are too complicated for the simple analysis thus far introduced in this set of courses. Prior knowledge needed: Undergraduate level physics, Undergraduate level calculus (e.g. manipulating integrals and derivatives, trigonometry and linear algebra, engineering problem-solving skills), Ability to run windows programs (Optics Studio), and Experience with Matlab or equivalent platform and Mathematica can be helpful.

Course 4: ECEA 5630: Semiconductor Physics (1 credit)
- This course introduces basic concepts of the quantum theory of solids and presents the theory describing the carrier behaviors in semiconductors. The course balances fundamental physics with application to semiconductors and other electronic devices. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Understand the energy band structures and their significance in the electric properties of solids. - Analyze the carrier statistics in semiconductors. - Analyze the carrier dynamics and the resulting conduction properties of semiconductors. Prior knowledge needed: Introductory physics including electromagnetics and modern physics and Introductory calculus and ordinary differential equations.

Course 5: ECEA 5631: Diode: pn Junction and Metal Semiconductor Contact (1 credit)
- This course presents in-depth discussion and analysis of pn junction and metal-semiconductor contacts including equilibrium behavior, current and capacitance responses under bias, breakdown, non-rectifying behavior, and surface effect. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Analyze pn junction at equilibrium and under bias, capacitance and current characteristics, and breakdown behavior. - Analyze metal-semiconductor contact at equilibrium and under bias, capacitance and current characteristics, non-rectifying contact, and surface effects. - Work through sophisticated analysis and application to electronic devices. Prior knowledge needed: ECEA 5630 Semiconductor Physics, Introductory physics including electromagnetics and modern physics and Introductory calculus and ordinary differential equations.

Course 6: ECEA 5632: Transistor: Field Effect Transistor and Bipolar Junction Transistor (1 credit)
- This course presents in-depth discussion and analysis of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) including the equilibrium characteristics, modes of operation, switching and current amplifying behaviors. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Understand and analyze the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device. - Understand and analyze MOS field-effect transistor (MOSFET). - Understand and analyze bipolar junction transistors (BJT). Prior knowledge needed: ECEA 5630 Semiconductor Physics, ECEA 5631 Diode Junction and Metal Semiconductor Contact, Understanding of active semiconductor devices, basic electronics, Circuits & Systems (e.g. Frequency Response Analysis), Basic understanding of carrier concentration and quantum theory and Calculus and Differential equations.

Course 7: ECEA 5605: Light Emitting Diodes and Semiconductors Lasers (1.2 credits)
- You will learn about semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers, and the important rules for their analysis, planning, design, and implementation. You will also apply your knowledge through challenging homework problem sets to cement your understanding of the material and prepare you to apply it in your career. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Design a semiconductor light-emitting diode and analyze the efficiency. - Design a semiconductor laser. - Choose suitable semiconductor materials for light-emitting devices. Prior knowledge needed: Undergraduate courses in physics, calculus, multivariable calculus, differential equations, modern physics/waves, electromagnetism quantum mechanics or quantum physics, statistical mechanics or thermal physics semiconductor physics. Graduate level courses in physical optics, lasers, and completion of semiconductor devices specialization (ECEA 5630 Semiconductor Physics, ECEA 5631 Diode: Junction and Metal Semiconductor Contact, and ECEA 5632 Transistor: field effect transistor and bipolar junction transistor). Specific skills to review before the course: Unit conversions for energy (i.e. eV to J) Planck's constant, Trigonometric & exponential functions, Algebraic manipulation, Partial derivatives, Polarization, Jones matrices/vectors, Conventional laser stimulated emission theory, Maxwell–Boltzmann vs. Fermi vs. Bose statistics, Quantum solution to the particle-in-the-box potential, and Basics of a semiconductor

Course 8: ECEA 5606: Nanophotonics and Detectors (1.2 credits)
- This course dives into nanophotonic light-emitting devices and optical detectors, including metal semiconductors, metal-semiconductor insulators, and pn junctions. We will also cover photoconductors, avalanche photodiodes, and photomultiplier tubes. Weekly homework problem sets will challenge you to apply the principles of analysis and design we cover in preparation for real-world problems. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Use nanophotonic effects (low dimensional structures) to engineer lasers. - Apply low-dimensional structures to photonic device design. - Select and design an optical detector for a given system and application. rior knowledge needed: Undergraduate courses in physics, calculus, multivariable calculus, differential equations, modern physics/waves, electromagnetism quantum mechanics or quantum physics, statistical mechanics, or thermal physics semiconductor physics. Graduate level courses in physical optics, lasers, and completion of semiconductor devices specialization (ECEA 5630 Semiconductor Physics, ECEA 5631 Diode: Junction and Metal Semiconductor Contact, and ECEA 5632 Transistor: field effect transistor and bipolar junction transistor). Specific skills to review before the course: Unit conversions for energy (i.e. eV to J), Planck's constant, Trigonometric & exponential functions, Algebraic manipulation, Partial derivatives, Polarization, Conventional laser stimulated emission theory, Maxwell–Boltzmann vs. Fermi vs. Bose statistics, Quantum solution to the particle-in-the-box potential and Basics of a semiconductor

Course 9: ECEA 5607: Displays (0.6 credits)
- The course will dive deep into electronic display devices, including liquid crystals, electroluminescent, plasma, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrowetting based displays. You'll learn about various design principles, affordances, and liabilities, and also a variety of applications in the real world of professional optics. __Learning Outcomes:__ - Select a display technology for a given application (LIDAR, imaging, microscopy, etc.). - Design a system around the limitations of a given display technology (i.e. addressing). - Design a system that maximizes contracts. Prior knowledge needed: Undergraduate courses in physics, calculus, multivariable calculus, differential equations, modern physics/waves, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics or quantum physics, statistical mechanics or thermal physics semiconductor physics. Graduate level courses in physical optics, lasers, and completion of semiconductor devices specialization (ECEA 5630 Semiconductor Physics, ECEA 5631 Diode: Junction and Metal Semiconductor Contact, and ECEA 5632 Transistor: field effect transistor and bipolar junction transistor). Specific skills to review before the course: Trigonometric & exponential functions, Algebraic manipulation, Polarization, Jones matrices/vectors, and Birefringence.

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